According to Google Trends, “Mindfulness” has become an increasingly popular search term over the past decade, and a variety of resources are available to date, including books, blogs, videos, and courses. In addition to its popularity, mindfulness has been studied empirically and become an evidence-based treatment for common problems such as anxiety and depression. Generally speaking, mindfulness involves bringing intentional focus to the present moment and observing the things you are experiencing at that moment for what they are, without judgment. Your observations may involve noticing thoughts, feelings, or bodily sensations. Mindfulness interventions are commonly carried out in person, but this form of intervention is difficult for people who live in rural areas and has become particularly challenging due to the COVID-19 pandemic which has restricted social interactions. Fortunately, a group of researchers found that the positive effects of mindfulness could also be achieved via an online platform.

In 2013, Krusche and colleagues evaluated the effects of a web-based mindfulness course for stress, anxiety, and depression with 273 participants. The authors developed 10 online interactive sessions led by mindfulness instructors, and participants participated for at least 4 weeks, but the course was designed to follow the same sequence as an 8-week mindfulness course. Participants were also given audio and video clips for guided meditation and assigned work to complete outside of sessions, including informal practice of mindfulness (i.e., being present while doing an everyday task such as washing the dishes). After the course had ended, results showed significant decreases in scores related to stress, anxiety, and depression, and these effects maintained at a 1-month follow up. The results of this study are promising and suggest that many people experiencing emotional challenges during this time might benefit from online interventions such as telehealth and video-based mindfulness instruction and guide practice.

Krusche, A., Cyhlarova, E., & Williams, J. M. G. (2013). Mindfulness online: An evaluation of the feasibility of a web-based mindfulness course for stress, anxiety and depression. BMJ Open Science. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-003498